Brazil: Brazil News & Brazilian Current Events | Latin American Current Events
Brazil: Brazil News & Brazilian Current Events | Latin American Current Events

 

A joke making the rounds in Latin American business circles says Brazil is looking increasingly like Argentina, Argentina is looking increasingly like Venezuela, and Venezuela is looking increasingly like Zimbabwe. Are things really going that bad?

  More  

Some of the best-known international institutions have just released their economic forecasts for Latin America in 2014, and most of them agree that this will be a better year than 2013 in the region. The big question is whether they aren't too optimistic

  More  

Latin America is one of the world's regions where corporations and the wealthy donate the least. This is in part because there are no tax incentives to donate, and there is an expectation that the government should be in charge of taking care of the poor

  More  

 

  • Fred scored in each half and Neymar added another as Brazil shocked World Cup champion Spain, 3-0, to win its third straight FIFA Confederations Cup

  • Emanuele Giaccherini slotted home the game-winning goal in the shootout as Italy claimed third place in the Confederation Cup with a 3-2 win over Uruguay after a 2-2 draw in regulation

  • It's no wonder that protesters in Brazil held signs reading 'more education, less soccer,' or that there are constant teacher strikes in Argentina, Chile, Venezuela and Mexico - Latin American schoolteachers are among the most miserably paid in the world

  • Perhaps Secretary of State John Kerry's lack of attention to Latin America might not be so bad after all - it is moving Vice President Joe Biden to get more involved with the region, and may help turn U.S.-Latin American relations into a White House foreign policy priority

  • The exodus of young Latin American entrepreneurs to Silicon Valley and other U.S. technology centers may soon become a two-way street as growing numbers of American techies are heading south to benefit from generous aid packages for high-tech startups

  • Latin American presidents who support decriminalization of marijuana won a big diplomatic victory in recent days when the 34-country Organization of American States issued a report that considers that option as one of several policies that might help reduce the region's drug-related violence

  • Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos may not have been hallucinating when he said that the Pacific Alliance - the bloc made up of Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Chile - 'is the new economic and development engine of Latin America and the Caribbean'

  • The highly respected Nature Scientific Reports journal has just published a map of the world's leading science cities, and it looks pretty bad for emerging countries: It shows the planet's northern hemisphere full of lights, and the south almost solidly dark

  • Barcelona has confirmed reaching a five-year deal with Brazilian star Neymar da Silva Santos Junior

  • New economic projections from the World Bank and the United Nations show that Latin America countries will keep growing at moderate rates this year, except for the booming economies of Paraguay, Panama and Peru

  • The U.S. Olympic Men's Volleyball Team upset top-ranked Brazil 23-25, 27-25, 25-19, 25-17 in a battle of undefeated teams during an Olympic Games Pool B match

  • President Obama's immigration plan calling for a huge increase in visas for foreign science and engineering graduates will pose a huge challenge for China, India and Latin America

  • In most Latin American countries, companies complain about the shortage of well-trained engineers. And the experience of China, India, Taiwan, and other Asian countries shows that producing large numbers of engineers pays off

  • A spirit of 'what is good for the USA is also good for Brazil' once defined Brazil's approach to foreign policy. Yet now Brazil is more aware of its power and influence

  • Conventional wisdom is that Venezuela was the big winner at the Mercosur summit when the country officially joined South America's trade bloc. But for me, the big winner was Brazil

  • As the world struggles to deal with its two largest foreign-affairs dilemmas, Syria and Iran, resolutely standing in the way are the BRICs

  • In what will be a rematch of the 2008 Beijing Olympic finals, Team USA and Brazil will be fighting for gold after they dominated their respective semi-finals with Korea and Japan

  • The Brazilian Women's Volleyball team will try to prolong its supremacy by taking on Team USA in the Olympic final after downing Japan in straight sets in the semi-finals

  • "We deserve this. Being given a chance of passing the semifinal, we now want gold. Now we play USA and we can do good things"

  • Even before the United States and Brazil begin their quest for Olympic glory in volleyball, one of them is virtually assured of gold, though this time around the event has been robbed off some of its sheen as Cuba failed to qualify

  • The United States national soccer team was brought down to earth as five-time world champion Brazil took advantage of the Americans sloppy play to score a 4-1 victory

  • Women leaders do not by definition implement policies promoting women's rights

  • Brazil's magic moment as the world's most promising emerging market in the eyes of international economic elites is waning, and replaced by a wave of gloomy forecasts

  • Latin American countries are forging a multi-polar world in which the U.S. looks increasingly out of touch

  • The rising trade barriers that Brazil is erecting to protect their industries imports are causing growing concern in the hemisphere

  • Bolivian President Evo Morales announced that he would rescind the contract awarded to Brazilian company OAS to build a road through the Amazon rainforest

  • Two new studies confirm what we have long suspected: Latin American companies cannot effectively compete in the world economy because their countries' educational systems are totally disconnected from reality

  • A key United Nations think tank that has been very bullish about Latin America in recent years is sounding a little less optimistic about the region's economies for 2012

  • President Obama's announcement that he will seek to create what may be the world's largest trading bloc along the Pacific rim raises an interesting question in this part of the world: whether we will see a de facto split of Latin America into a Pacific and Atlantic bloc

  • Colombia, traditionally Washington's best ally in the region, is cozying up to Brazil and building a solid commercial, financial and political network with its neighbor while Washington becomes more and more isolated

  • A new United Nations report has good news for Latin America: it says that poverty levels in the region have dropped to their lowest levels in 20 years. But are the U.N. figures about Latin America as great as they sound?

  • Prosperity, security, and a lowered level of poverty generally accompany economic growth; however, Brazil's economy, though growing rapidly, is experiencing record inflation and an appreciating currency. However, the practical consequences of a sudden currency appreciation can prove to be ominous, often contributing to greater economic insecurity

  • Across Latin America, governments are hailing security gains against organized criminal groups. Yet in spite of more arrests, criminal networks are stronger and criminality just as pervasive, suggesting that another reality lies behind the numbers.

  • Brazil's announcement that it will send 100,000 science and engineering students to get advanced degrees abroad went almost unnoticed, but it's worth paying attention to -- it's the kind of thing that will determine which countries will get ahead in the knowledge-based 21st century

  • Joseph Stiglitz is quite upbeat about Latin America, Asia and other emerging economies when I interviewed him extensively about the possibility of a new world recession

  • Diplomatic niceties aside, there are several issues that are raising bilateral tensions between Brazil and the United States

  • With two years to go before the World Cup in Brazil, already people are questioning the massive evictions caused by the Cup's enormous infrastructure projects and the legal privileges that must be conceded to the all-powerful FIFA

  • Regionalists need a reminder that development doesn't end politics and that contemporary Latin America has its own power dynamics

  • With a little under a year remaining until the next U.S. presidential election, a coherent and sustainable area policy toward Latin America remains absent from the campaign literature and both parties' electoral strategies

  • Brazil has been making great strides toward securing a prosperous future, but one of its recent actions has centered on resolving a troubling aspect of the country's past. On October 27, state officials announced a plan to establish a truth and reconciliation commission that will investigate crimes against humanity from 1946 to 1988

  • A major strategic challenge for the United States in the coming decades will be integrating emerging powers into international institutions. The dramatic growth of Brazil, China, and India -- and the emergence of middle-tier economies such as Indonesia and Turkey -- is transforming the geopolitical landscape and testing the institutional foundations of the post-World War II world order

  • Brazilian business leaders have concluded that the answer to the region's education problems is not likely to come from governments -- or from politicians -- but from civil society. Digging deeper into the Brazilian pro-education movement, I found that Brazil's civil society has been more pro-active than that of other countries in the region

  • There is a consensus among foreign policy pundits that Brazil is the upcoming world emerging power. Maybe so, but only if it can overcome a potentially fatal domestic obstacle -- hubris.

  • A new World Bank study is likely to raise high hopes in Brazil, Argentina, Peru and other South American commodity exporters. It says that, contrary to the recent conventional wisdom, raw materials can be the engine of long-term economic growth. But is it true? Or is it World Bank wishful thinking?

  • Brazil's self-proclaimed diplomatic victory in Iran led pundits to speculate that the South American country has become a major new player in world affairs. But they were most likely wrong, or at the very least spoke to soon.

  • The agreement reached in which Iran would send about half of its low-enriched uranium to Turkey to be enriched signaled a new unity in the leadership in Tehran, says analyst Farideh Farhi. She says that while the regime continues to worry about its perceived legitimacy domestically, the agreement with Brazil and Turkey has strong public support

  • A short news item in Brazil's news magazine Veja suggests that President Luiz In‡cio Lula da Silva is considering running for United Nations Secretary General after he leaves office at the end of this year. If true, that would explain a lot of things.

  • Brazil's key diplomatic support of Iran's increasingly isolated regime is baffling the international community. There are several theories about Brazil's behavior, some of them quite troubling.

  • With Brazil's government-backed presidential hopeful Dilma Roussef rising in the polls, some of her most prominent critics are raising the specter that South America's biggest country will move closer to the radical left if she wins the October elections

  • Only a few months ago, Latin American leaders hailed the Obama administration as a new beginning in hemispheric relations. But now, the honeymoon is over as Brazil is leading criticism of U.S. foreign policy

  • Brazil will have to stop being an inward-looking giant. Brazil can't keep relying on its domestic consumption either, nor on ever-rising commodity prices. If it doesn't cease being a self-absorbed giant, it risks becoming a once-emerging power

  • A new study on corruption in Latin America contains some alarming figures -- an average of about 20 percent of the region's people say they have been asked to pay a bribe by a policeman or another public official in the past year

  • After decades of peace and economic development, why is the United States engaged in a major military buildup in Latin America? Why has the U.S. turned a blind eye to two successful, and one attempted, coups in the last three years?

  • Few paid attention to a news item that should have raised eyebrows -- a new ranking of the world's best universities shows a near total absence of Latin American schools

  • You have to give credit to Brazil for what it's doing to combat corruption and solve the worst political scandal in the country's recent history

  • We all know what conventional economists say about the future of Latin America: countries that pursue populist policies will go downhill, whereas countries that pursue 'responsible' economic policies will do great

  • Russia and Brazil will cross paths for the first time in an Olympic Final after they edged Bulgaria and Italy respectively in the semis played on Friday at Earls Court

  • Brazil played a spectacular game to down Italy in straight sets (25-21, 25-12, and 25-21) in what turned into a demonstration of world-class volleyball, confidence and fighting spirit

  • The 2012 Olympic Games women's volleyball gold-medal match has some striking similarities to the Beijing Games four years ago as the top two teams -- United States and Brazil -- meet once again

  • When Yane Marques began modern pentathlon at the age of 19, she didn't have any running skills and had only seen fencing on TV. Nine years later, she is one of Brazil's Olympic medal hopefuls

  • Brazil's hopes of winning its first Olympic gold medal have suffered a big blow as goalkeeper Rafael Cabral suffered a right elbow injury and was ruled out of the London Games

  • Producing feed for 500 million pigs is no mean feat and China's agricultural sector is already operating at its limits. As a result China has been forced to look abroad for its animal feed, in particular for soya beans

  • We must give credit to populist leaders in Latin America for doing a masterful brainwashing job -- they have somehow convinced millions that there is a huge world capitalist media conspiracy out there

  • After two and a half sets it looked like Brazil would cruise to their third Olympics title, but the Brazilians eventually missed out to Russia

  • After losing the opening set to Team USA, 25-11, Brazil rallied to win the next 3 sets for a come-from-behind 3-1 win to win their second consecutive Olympic Gold Medal

  • Excuse my impertinence, but Brazil, Argentina, Colombia and several other Latin American countries deserve much of the blame for the recent forced exit of former Paraguayan President Fernando Lugo

  • Residents of one Bahian quilombo clashed with members of Brazil's military. The inhabitants of Quilombo do Rio do Macaco drew media attention as officials from the Aratu Naval Base encroached on the community's fringes

  • FIVB world champions Juliana and Larissa staged a second-set comeback to beat China's Chen Xue and Zhang Xi in the London 2012 Olympic Games bronze medal match

  • Germany's Julius Brink and Jonas Reckermann wasted three match points, but won gold with the fourth as they beat Brazil's Alison Cerutti and Emanuel Rego in a three-set thriller

  • The much awaited quarterfinals of the men's Olympic tournament eventually ended in four straight-set victories for Brazil, Italy, Russia and Bulgaria

  • Condoleezza Rice, whose boss President George W. Bush vowed during the 2000 campaign to make Latin America a 'fundamental commitment' of his presidency, devotes only two of the 58 chapters of her memoir 'No Higher Honor' to the region. That's about 15 pages of the 766-page book, plus a few sporadic references here and there

  • Brazil has been able to avoid a major setback from the global financial crisis, due largely to its burgeoning trade relationship with China

  • IBSA, comprised of India, Brazil, and South Africa, has improved trade and cooperation among the countries since 2003 IBSA is notable for its South-South cooperation and anti-hegemonic rhetoric However it is not necessarily an easy model for other Southern nations

  • A string of recent events indicates that Amazonian deforestation and violence against environmental activists are on the rise

  • With its growing economy -- now the world's eighth largest -- and vast resources, Brazil has become a major global power. Yet it still is not viewed as a 'global player with a global agenda'

  • There is a little-noticed but potentially important development in Latin America's human rights front -- Brazil, the biggest country in the region, is becoming a little less supportive of tyrants around the world

  • Latin America should take a close look at the latest U.S. technological innovation figures: They show that, despite signs of progress in several countries, the gap between Asian and Latin American countries keeps widening

  • Brazilian soccer great Pele stated Argentine and Barcelona striker Lionel Messi is miles away to equaling his legendary feats

  • Every year brings about changes, but 2012 is likely to be an especially eventful one in the Americas: there will be elections in the United States, Mexico and Venezuela, as well as other news events that could change the political map

  • A new ranking of Latin America's best universities shows that Brazil is way ahead of the pack, with the No. 1 school and 65 of the best 200 in the region. It suggests that Brazil may become 'the next university superpower'

  • The turmoil for reform sweeping most Middle Eastern oil producers is grabbing big headlines today, but that region may lose some of its economic clout in the future: there are signs that the Americas will replace the Middle East as the world's biggest oil-producing region

  • I read a press report that Brazil's tourism minister was illegally using a government driver as his wife's private chauffeur. By the time I arrived in Brasilia seven hours later, the minister had already been sacked. What a difference with what is happening in many other Latin American countries

  • In what could give a blow to government's ambitious plan to boost national energy production, a Brazilian federal court ordered immediate halt of $11 billion Belo Monte hydroelectric dam's construction, saying it could affect local fishing

  • There is no longer any question: wealth and power are moving from the North and the West to the East and the South, and the old order dominated by the United States and Europe is giving way to one increasingly shared with non-Western rising states. But if the great wheel of power is turning, what kind of global political order will emerge in the aftermath?

  • Across the region in recent years, the United States has seen its influence decline. Latin American countries are increasingly looking for solutions among themselves, forming their own regional organizations that exclude the United States and seeking friends and opportunities outside of Washington's orbit. Some allies are even reconsidering the primacy of relations with the United States

  • President Barack Obama's announcement that he will visit Brazil, Chile and El Salvador could result in an improvement in Brazil-U.S. ties following a significant downturn over the past two years.

  • I recently returned from a trip to South America, where I was struck by the ways in which Chile and Brazil, the two countries I visited, have, on key issues like defeating poverty, transcended the tired division between left and right the United States seems hopelessly mired in

  • Following the recent decisions by Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Bolivia and Ecuador to officially recognize a state of Palestine, supporters of the Palestinian cause are preparing for their next big step: a South America-wide declaration recognizing a Palestinian state in a territory that would include East Jerusalem and other territories currently held by Israel

  • In the last decade, Brazil has recast itself as a global brand and a global power. Brazil is home to the world's fifth-largest land mass and eighth-largest economy and is one of the top global producers of stuff everyone else needs. The new conventional wisdom suggests that Brazil is now poised to make its name on the global stage

  • When the presidents of Brazil, Mexico and Argentina attended the G-20 meeting of the world's biggest economies in South Korea, they should have taken some time off from the conference to take a look at the host country. They could have learned why South Korea has done so much better than their own nations

  • Brazil, the United States and the Organization of American States deserve a gold medal each for their awful handling of recent presidential elections in Honduras. Let's examine how the main international players behaved ...

  • A new United Nations report predicts a 40 percent drop in foreign investments in Latin America this year. I hope I'm wrong about this, but the fall in foreign funds may be even steeper.

  • The news that Brazil and Mexico have come out of the recession and are poised for solid growth in 2010 should be celebrated, and both countries' leaders should be given credit for their sound economic management. But in the global economic context, the two Latin American giants' recovery will be modest.

  • Brazil's Vice President Jose Alencar made big headlines recently when he stated that Brazil should have the right to have nuclear weapons, which he said would give his country a greater 'dissuasive' power and more 'respectability' in world affairs.

  • In 2003, a report authored by Goldman Sachs economists popularized the term BRICs -- Brazil, Russia, India and China -- to describe a whole new category of emerging-market powerhouse. The report argued that with sound political leadership and relative international stability, the BRIC economies would together outpace the original G6 industrialized nations in dollar terms by 2040 -- a fundamental shift in the global balance of power. Since then, these four countries have assumed ever-greater importance in the international investment community's collective imagination.

  • The financial crisis has left few corners of the global economy unscathed, but many of the loudest cries reflecting the deepest pain are largely ignored. These are the cries of the world's poorest citizens whose suffering is not measured in battered portfolios and retirement plans but in their daily survival

  • Brazil, Latin America's biggest country, has received well-deserved praise in recent years for its responsible economic policies. There is hardly a dictator -- or repressive government -- that Brazil doesn't like, human rights groups say.

  • Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva's largely unnoticed trip to Central America last week underscored an interesting phenomenon: Brazil is making big inroads into a region that was traditionally seen as Mexico's backyard

  • Brazil, India and even China will not be able, by themselves, to correct the dysfunctions that produced the global crisis. But it is true that the economic power of these three countries can mitigate its negative consequences. ...