The a.m. rush does not have to send you over the edge. You can definitely make a speedy departure -- and save your sanity -- by planning ahead. Read on for some smart tips that'll reduce your family's morning rush

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It is easy for parents, and especially other moms, to be in competition. Most of us want to show off our kids and let the world know how wonderful they are -- but at what expense? Here's how to avoid one-upmanship with competitive parents

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There is nothing wrong with saying no and meaning it. When you say no to something and then go back on your word, it will be hard for your kids to know when you are being serious and when you aren't. Here's why you shouldn't feel bad about saying no

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Time-outs are an excellent way to discipline children, but they don't always work. When they fail, try one of these four ideas that can help you improve your child's behavior

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If there's one thing everyone knows about babies, it's that they cry. Frequently. But why do healthy babies cry? The things that make them fuss (and things that won't) may surprise you. Harvey Karp, M.D. explains why baby crying does and does not occur

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Getting your baby on a sleep schedule really depends on one thing: routine. The activities that make up the routine aren't as important as being consistent with them. Here's how to get your baby into a regular sleep routine

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  • Ask any busy mom what's on her wish list, and 'more time' inevitably comes up. We asked the experts to give us their tips for streamlining daily routines. Incorporate these suggestions and you may actually find yourself with a little extra 'me' time

  • It happens to every expectant mother: The powerful urge to nest. But there's a downside to the pregnancy nesting instinct: Overdoing it can be dangerous. Here are some safe and fun ways to indulge the pregnancy nesting urge and prepare for baby's arrival

  • The baby-to-be is still inside her womb, and the woman is hoping that by reading to her baby and playing classical music she's developing the baby's mind as well as his body. But is she?

  • According to experts, there's a lot you can do to boost baby's brainpower even before birth. Here are some specific strategies to help your baby's brain development and give him (or her!) the brightest beginnings

  • When it comes to taking care of your newborn, most things are instinctual. Feed, burp, change diapers. But what may seem like a no-brainer -- your baby sleeping in her crib -- actually requires some forethought and safety education

  • This generation of mommies buys natural and organic and wants the same for their offspring in their nursery gadgets. Check out our favorite baby gadgets that epitomize healthy baby chic

  • Shopping for a car seat may not be as much fun as picking out a crib and layette, but it's one of the most important products you'll choose as a new parent. Keep these tips in mind when you're buying and installing a baby car seat

  • Infants aren't born walking and talking, so it should come as no surprise that they aren't born seeing perfectly, either. So what does baby see? Here's the typical timeline that vision development follows. Plus, how you can help stimulate baby's sense of sight

  • One of the best things my parents did for our family was something that, as a child, I probably would have dismissed by saying, 'That doesn't count.' Several nights a week, my parents made a home-cooked meal. We ate together as a family every night

  • Feel like you're stuck in a dull daily routine? While being stuck in a mommy rut may feel inescapable, it doesn't have to be. Here are five ways to to boost your morale and get re-invigorated

  • While it's impossible to banish the viruses that cause cold and flu, you can limit your family's exposure to them at home. We sorted through the research to find the smart ways you can protect your family

  • Here are three myths that I hear often in my practice ... and the truth behind each one. Read on; you just might be surprised at the truth behind cold and flu myths

  • To keep your family healthy and safe this flu season, it's important to know all you can about the flu. Here are seasonal flu fundamentals on everything from symptoms to prevention

  • Helping a sick child is much more than taking temperatures and doling out medicine. Our expert swears by the following four staples to comfort and soothe

  • Here's a look at the best technology for moms from this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas

  • All the help you ever needed is just a few taps away. Here's the best iPhone apps for moms

  • You can read all the books you want, but only experience can teach you what being a mom is all about. Here are some things only a mother will tell you

  • It's no surprise that positive parenting affects a child's health and happiness. Countless studies have shown powerful benefits of dad's participation

  • Financial responsibility, for the most part, stopped with the piggy bank. So, how can you teach your children the importance of saving, accounting for their spending, and self-discipline? Here are some money management strategies and tactics for parents that can help kids take control of their financial futures

  • Use these games and activities to make learning good table manners fun

  • There are lots of parenting guides on how to deal with defiant children, but this is probably the only one written by a former defiant child.

  • It's not easy for new parents to juggle work and family. That's why some companies offer perks to help employees transition into parenthood while continuing to succeed at the office. Here are eight perks for new parents that companies across the country offer to employees

  • Here are some of the ways child-friendly college and university programs are helping mothers earn bachelor's degrees

  • Here, a few creative and simple sick-day activities to make the most of your day together

  • Kids want to learn more about finances from their parents, if only parents would open up

  • You often hear parents talk about children being 'gifted.' But what does that term really mean -- and can you develop it in your child?

  • To protect your kids from serious sports injuries, prevention is key. But if an accident does occur, be prepared. Here's how to spot and treat the most common injuries in kids' sports

  • Soccer players who frequently head the ball face the possibility of brain injury and cognitive impairment, according to a new study

  • William Dietz, a medical doctor and pediatrics expert who directs the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, discusses the nation's problems with childhood obesity and what parents can do to encourage healthy choices by their children

  • Obesity and the problems associated with it -- type 2 diabetes, heart disease, joint problems and more -- begin in childhood. If we can't change our children's eating and exercise habits we have no hope of stemming the tide of ongoing obesity. In that vein, we must begin modeling better eating habits for our children by returning to the idea of family meals

  • It's no secret that childhood obesity is a major issue in the United States. At the core of the problem is the fact that less than one third of all children ages 6 to 17 get regular vigorous exercise, defined as at least 20 minutes of physical activity that makes them sweat and breathe hard. So what should parents do to get their kids moving more often? Here are 5 tips to get started

  • We've done the legwork for you and found the top three social networks for kids. Here's how they keep kids entertained while making their safety a top priority

  • Although digital communities enable youths to socialize with peers and develop multimedia skills, these online forums also have risks. Fortunately there are ways for parents to help their children avoid these new types of harm

  • New research shows the increasing dangers kids face online. Here's how you can help

  • Here's some advice to keep up with your child's technology, while also keeping your family safe from digital traps

  • A decade ago, reading your teen's diary would have been the ultimate form of privacy invasion. Nowdays, checking out their Facebook page or Twitter feed can yield the same sense of betrayal -- if they don't know you're doing so. So how does a parent protect their kids from the dangers lurking on the Internet? The answer may be to join them online.

  • It hit me about two months ago that evenings in front of the TV, video games, and computer at my house had finally gotten out of control. So I came up with an idea: The kids would have to turn off all screens at 9 p.m. and keep them off until bedtime

  • It's time to reign in the connectivity: Recent studies have found that teens who sacrifice sleep time for screen time are at a greater risk for sleep disorders, mood swings and depression -- not to mention a less-than-stellar performance at school due to shortened attention spans. Here are five ways to help them find a better balance

  • The average American child spends four to five hours a day in front of a screen -- that's roughly one-third of their waking time either in front of a TV or a computer, and all that screen time could be adding up to poor health. Parents should consider the following strategies

  • Unfortunately, bullying is far too common these days. It seems like there's a headline in the news every day after a child brings a gun to school to threaten others, a child is beaten into a coma by bullies, or a child even takes his or her own life after being bullied

  • The average American child spends four to five hours a day in front of a screen -- that's roughly one-third of their waking time either in front of a TV or a computer, and all that screen time could be adding up to poor health.

  • There's a new social networking site called Formspring.me, Formspring, with 29 million users, is hot-hot-hot among teenagers, especially middle schoolers. Turns out Formspring is a highly effective way to insult, belittle and spread rumors.

  • Sure, you love to surf the Internet. But are you playing it safe? Here are some Internet safety tips every teen and parent should know.

  • Violent and possibly addictive, video games have become a major part of American childhood. What should parents do?

  • Keeping your life on track means balancing work, family, friends and alone time, as well as making sure everything runs smoothly. For that, look for help from these five Internet tools

  • For new and soon-to-be parents who are still on the fence about splurging on assistance, here's a guide to the services most worth their price, as well as tips on finding the most affordable versions of help

  • I get a lot of questions from new parents who are runners about the use of jogging strollers. When researching the issue in the pediatric literature, I couldn't find a consensus about when it's safe and appropriate to use such a stroller with a newborn

  • When it comes to reducing the eco-impact of your wee one, every hand-me-down -- from a bib to a set of blocks -- can help. Accepting previously loved items from friends rather than buying used goods from an unknown source is just one idea. Here are some other things to remember when you're on the hunt for vintage goods for your baby

  • If you've been watching your youngsters head to school burdened by heavy backpacks, you've probably wondered if they're doing their bodies harm. One way to find out is to weigh your kids, then weigh their fully loaded packs

  • And so begins another mother-son exchange that leaves me wondering if my kids truly listen or if my words float off unheeded like dust motes in a ray of sunshine. With my days of mothering a minor numbered, prom season becomes one more opportunity to worm my way into his head and, perhaps, into his heart. I'm running out of time.

  • How far would you go to have others think you're cool? Would you steal from a store? Pull a cruel prank on a teacher? If you'd take risks and behave in ways you normally wouldn't just to follow the pack, that's caving in to peer pressure.

  • Change is most dramatic for children starting a new chapter -- kindergarten, middle school, a move to a new school district. But even returning to what's familiar can rattle kids. So how can you help? First, be calm -- even if your child isn't. Then, try these tips for a smooth ride into the new school year

  • They are all over the Internet, short video clips with titles out of a boxing poster. Raul vs. Pedro. Red vs. Robert. Twinkie vs. Saylor. But these are not professional fighters. These are kids. High school kids, middle-school kids. They punch each other, pound each other, slap, yank, pull, tackle, rip, scratch and kick each other. And all the time, someone is filming.

  • What might the highly publicized suicide of a Massachusetts girl tormented by cyber-bullying have in common with the videotaped fatal beating of a teenaged boy in Chicago? Other students apparently knew that trouble was brewing, but no one managed to step in and stop it.

  • There is a recent rise in girl-on-girl physical violence, but most girl bullies use smack talk to intimidate their victims -- and they even take their smear campaigns online for widespread humiliation. Here, we point out a bully's weak spots so you can see straight through that plastic Queen of Mean mask she's hiding behind

  • What are mornings like at your house? If you're like most moms, it's probably the busiest part of your day. The beginning of the day tends to be chaotic and stressful for a bunch of reasons. With some key planning and organizational strategies, it is possible to turn the morning mayhem into a peaceful and manageable routine. Here's how busy moms can make it happen

  • Encouraging your children to pitch in around the house helps them as much as it helps you. Kids expected to do their fair share tend to develop a sense of accomplishment and pride. They also learn how to handle responsibility. The key is to start early -- and to be patient. Ready to get started? Follow these five pointers for putting your kids to work

  • It's no secret that most kids watch too much television. For years, psychologists and pediatricians have sounded alarms that excessive television time contributes to an array of modern childhood problems -- from obesity to a failure to develop new interests. The good news is: If you start early, you can raise kids with a balanced and appropriate TV diet. Here's how

  • Most kids love the holidays -- and all the giving and getting that goes with them. So why not tap into that enthusiasm for a quick lesson in money management? If you want to teach kids that buying decisions should involve time to think, holiday shopping is the perfect moment. Here are six lessons you can start teaching right now

  • Certainly, kids shouldn't be paid every time they put a dish in the dishwasher. But there are chores, tasks and jobs that require extra effort and time. And in this culture, money is the best thing we have to acknowledge our kids' contribution when they take them on according to Peter L. Sheras. Here, some primo projects for teens and preteens

  • 'Mommy, I don't feel good.' Sound familiar? It's the call of an ill child who's stuck in bed. It breaks your heart, but there are plenty of things you can do. Experts say the best course of action includes activities that are low-key and keep a child busy without wearing her out. Here are 11 comforting and clever ways to help kids have fun while they recover.

  • Is your wife a strict disciplinarian, while you prefer to let things slide? Is your husband a yeller, while you are an 'inside voice' kind of mom? When you have different parenting styles, it can often feel like you're at odds with your spouse. Here are strategies from Harvey Karp, M.D. for navigating this common parenting conundrum.

  • For decades, pop psych has embraced the premise that there are three basic parenting styles: authoritarian, permissive, and last but not least, authoritative. The authoritative approach -- a combination of no-nonsense limit-setting with understanding and concern -- which experts say is ideal. Not sure where you fit in? Check out these scenarios

  • I believe in miracles, in sobering transformations and life-changing experiences. But maybe I've been reading too much fiction. Consider my latest encounter with reality: I sent my 18-year-old off to college. Now he has returned, for the holidays, a 19-year-old with 'college dorm' experience. Which is to say he has acquired some interesting habits

  • In today's world of fast and convenient food, many people have disordered eating. The evidence of obesity, anorexia, bulimia, binge eating, and an obsession with dieting is proof we aren't healthy eaters. The problem is many of the people with unhealthy relationships to food are parents, and that makes them role models for their children.

  • Spanking is a huge hot-button issue for parents. Many psychologists say that spanking or any other physical discipline harms children and their relationship with their parents. But quite a few parents disagree, and some experts do, too.

  • A Pew Research Center study earlier this summer found that while two-thirds of Americans 16 and older saw an age divide, respondents didn't believe it caused a lot of problems in their families or society. The generational squabble, the report states, "is a much more subdued affair than the one that raged in the 1960s."

  • Many of us parents believe purchasing educational toys or providing them with the latest technology will help them to be smarter, more creative or at the very least help them to get a head start. But there are rumblings that these assumptions of what helps children learn and develop may well have been based more on effective marketing than on any real proof.

  • Ah, siblings: both a blessing and a curse. Approximately 80 percent of Americans have at least one brother or sister; in fact, kids today are more likely to grow up with a sibling than a father, experts say. What's more, the sibling relationship is the longest relationship that most people will have in their lives.

  • Oh, my, how those girls love their soaps! They sing to the bars, take them on outings and, when it's time to go night-night, tuck them in a necktie gift box I've labeled the soap dorm.

  • The secret to keeping your little bundle of joy feeling happy, cozy, secure and sleeping is swaddling -- a method of wrapping infants that's both ancient and modern. Here's how to swaddle your baby safely and effectively

  • Did you ever imagine the piles of dirty baby laundry that seem to multiply by the hour now that there's a baby in the house? Laundry, you'll soon learn, is a job that's never done when you have kids. Here are some tips to help you keep it simple

  • Now that the novelty of summer vacation has worn off, moms everywhere are scrambling for new ideas to keep their families entertained. Instead of resorting to putting on another DVD, consider the following ideas

  • There's no way to know what sleep deprivation truly feels like until you have your newborn at home. It's true: The first six weeks are brutal. But, there are strategies that can help. Here are five of the most surprising sleep tactics to help you reclaim your rest

  • Family movie nights are one of the most fun and affordable ways to spend time together. But choosing a flick the whole crew agrees on can be a struggle! To the rescue: our list of family-friendly movies sure to pleasure kids and parents alike

  • Traveling can leave kids cranky or bored -- and parents frustrated. But you can steer clear of these bumps in the road with a little advance preparation. With the following simple strategies, your next trip will be less stressful -- and more memorable

  • While talking to my daughter for the umpteenth time about the importance of cleaning up her room, I felt a bit of familiarity that was too close to home. I began to have that dramatic shrill that my mom used to have when she chastised me about something

  • You new moms and dads deserve a night out. But your first evening away from baby can be more nerve-racking than stress-reducing. Here's how to ease new mom separation anxiety for both you and baby

  • Don't get me wrong; I'm no stranger to mom guilt. Who is? Mom guilt comes in all forms and from all directions

  • To make sure you're not jumping the gun, look for the following signs before considering sports for your kids

  • Sometimes my favorite company is my own

  • One reason children are so expensive is because parents make many common mistakes that end up hurting their bank accounts. Here are 10 frequent missteps, adapted from the new book Generation Earn, and how to avoid them

  • What should parents do with their savings? It turns out that there are some new strategies that work better than the traditional methods of saving. Here are five new, smart ways to save for your children

  • When it comes to learning manners, practice makes perfect. But you have to know what your kids are developmentally capable of before you set any expectations. With that in mind, here are tips for teaching kids the basic social skills they need to succeed

  • Going around the table saying what you're thankful for is great, but it doesn't teach your child what it really means to give thanks. Teaching gratitude is an everyday job -- and the benefits are huge. Here's how to make your child happier, healthier and more thankful

  • Kids are naturally many things: They're curious, funny and loving. But one thing they're not is thoughtful. Empathy for others is a trait that must be learned -- and you are the best person to teach it. Volunteering together is an excellent way to increase your child's social and emotional growth while spending quality time together. Here, some age-by-age ideas for lending a helping hand.

  • We can't protect our children from every stressful situation that life throws at them. Instead, it's important to teach them to recognize the signs of stress and learn how to react in a positive, healthy way. Here's practical tips for helping your kids stress less

  • By the time they reach school age, kids are as skilled at debating as politicians on the campaign trail. But while their persistence can wear you down, giving in to their pleas will only encourage them to keep it up. If you say no, and your child learns to accept it, your child learns to accept your values. Here are five steps for saying no

  • Young football players may be at a higher risk of suffering a stroke than their peers, according to a new study

  • As parents, coaches and mentors, we have a responsibility to help young adults make the right nutritional and wellness choices that will best support both their academic and athletic endeavors. Here's a set of worthwhile tips

  • With summer heat at its peak across the country and kids heading back to school athletics, band practice, drill team and the like, this is a good time to discuss heat-related illnesses and their prevention.

  • Here's what every parent needs to know about these flu strains going into the 2011 – 2012 season

  • Researchers have studied the effects of your mom's chicken soup, steamy baths and more on colds. We'll tell you what really works

  • No mom wants her child to feel miserable -- and the common cold can really wipe a kid out! Fortunately, combining a few simple moves with time-tested remedies can help ease your little one's symptoms. So the next time she starts coughing and sneezing, try these savvy tricks to soothe your sick kid in no time

  • Your child drops an animal cracker on the floor, then bends over to pick it up and eat it. You think to yourself, '10-second rule!' But how bad is it, really? Are you letting your kids pick up germs and bacteria, or are they actually boosting their immune systems? To find out when -- and if -- being a germophobe mom pays, we talked with expert Carole Marsh. Here's what she had to say

  • Germ-killing toothpastes, antibacterial soaps, sanitizing deodorants, bacteria-banishing home cleaners. With all of these products on the market, you'd think everything in hand's reach is likely to make your family sick. But are all germ-killing products really protecting us in the long run? Here's us the lowdown on which products are worth it and which aren't

  • My 7-week-old son is often inconsolable, to the point where he will cry for up to six hours a day. He's extremely gassy and at times seems to be in pain and cannot nap comfortably. Our pediatrician says that it's most likely colic. Please help me understand this condition and what I can do to help him. Is this something he will outgrow?

  • No parent enjoys hearing a child cough, even though coughing is the body's way of keeping the lungs clear and preventing pneumonia. Here's a guide to deciphering and treating the most common types of cough symptoms.

  • We asked the experts for a guide to cold medicine that helps clear up the confusion

  • If you're considering whether your children get enough sleep, these healthy and simple sleep habits will help

  • When a baby is born, the natural preoccupation is with taking and distributing photos of the adorable child. That's understandable, but financial considerations should not be far behind

  • I attribute the fact that my four year old daughter eats everything, from oysters and rabbit ragu to kale and carrot juice, to pure and simple luck. Other parents ask, especially when they see her slurp down an oyster, how we get her to eat so well. When I say it is all luck, I'm not lying. But the truth is, I also use a few tricks

  • For most parents, having school-aged children means you are on lunch duty for 10 months. But how do you keep kids interested in eating lunches that are relatively healthy instead of ditching them for the alluring fast or junk food that they see the other kids eating?

  • It's common for kids to dislike or refuse to eat some fruits and vegetables. Your best bet is to be a good role model by eating the green stuff yourself (and at least acting like you enjoy it!). Here are a few tips to get your child to eat more fruits and vegetables

  • We've all heard of the kid who won't eat anything except chicken fingers and hot dogs -- and maybe you recognize this child well because he or she is yours. Although most children aren't this extreme, many are still not eating as much healthy foods as their parents would like

  • These days, buying breakfast cereals can be confusing. Many carry healthy labels or promote some health benefit even if they aren't the best choice for health. To ensure that you're buying a healthy product for your family, read labels and look for the following cues

  • Say so long to that tired PB&J sandwich and sugary juice box -- and hello to delicious, nutritious school-lunch ideas that your child will devour. Help your child ace her exams and stay healthy by making over her lunchbox with these healthy school-lunch ideas

  • The news on childhood obesity is almost universally bad, including this latest item: Kids snack three times a day on junk food, accounting for almost one third of their daily calories. Parents do have the power to help protect our children against the health risks of obesity, starting now. Here are three practical steps you can take today

  • Finding the right day-care center requires a balance of many practical issues: location, cost, hours of operation. And you of course also want a nurturing staff. Narrow down your choices and find a safe day care facility for your child by considering these four questions

  • Choosing an after-school program is a big decision. Before you choose anything for your child, find out what's involved. Some activities require monthly fees, uniforms, shoes, etc. Fortunately, no matter what you sign up for, there are usually a few steps you can take to save on your child's after-school programs

  • Here's a Back-to-School Shopping guide to spending less while still making sure your child is ready to learn

  • Whether your children are starting at a new school or returning to their stomping grounds, heading back into the classroom can be stressful. To make things easier on your entire family, try these moves to ease back-to-school stress

  • August and September are two of the most expensive months of the year thanks to back-to-school shopping. But there are still plenty of ways to stretch your dollar and get more bang for your buck

  • In the summer, many families create memories and cool down at the beach, lake, or pool. Of course, the main concern is fun, but the first thing that comes to my mind when I think of water is safety

  • To help your little swimmers create happy memories of their own, it's important to keep them safe and healthy. Here's six key tips to avoid swimming dangers

  • It seems almost inconceivable, yet, tragically, it has happened more than 500 times. What are we talking about? Children who have died of heatstroke while in a parked automobile. Here's what parents and caregivers need to do to avoid this tragedy

  • If you're the parent of a teenage driver, it can be a bit nervewracking! The best way to keep your nerves in check is to establish and enforce the rules of the road

  • Rest assured that you can still simplify your morning routine to get out the door in 10 minutes flat, looking and feeling your best. Here's practical tips for parents

  • This may seem like a big undertaking, but you really can make the world a better place for baby without breaking your budget. As a mom of three brilliant, healthy and (mostly) happy children, I know firsthand that creating a better world doesn't have to be overwhelming or only for movie-star millionaires. Here are my three easy guidelines for improving your baby's world

  • College administrators say they're coping with a growing crop of freshmen suffering the aftereffects of having been raised by overinvolved parents. These moms and dads may see their tendency to hover and help at every step as loving and protective. To prep kids to thrive in college rather than struggle, parents should begin to break their overprotective habits. Here's how

  • In a country where nearly three million students are receiving special education services for a learning disability, many parents are hungry for ways to support their children's learning. The problem many children face is they've lost their zest for learning. Here's a few key steps to reinforce learning

  • As a mother, I would do almost anything to give my children a leg up in life. This is true, I think, for most conscientious parents. Call it biological imperative, if you will. This is why the 'educational' label is so ubiquitous, and learning colors, figuring out shapes and identifying letters has turned into Big Business

  • It may be easier and faster to take care of it yourself, but that doesn't help your kids learn responsibility and gain organizational skills. And if you don't teach them how to pick up after themselves, they're not likely to do it. Help your kids take control of their stuff with this step-by-step guide.

  • OK, I'll fess up. I have screamed at my kids. I have screamed out of frustration. I have screamed because they should know better. I have screamed when I'm rushed, overwhelmed, anxious, or because I've just plain had it with their boorish behavior.

  • Whether it's a result of a surgery or something more common such as a cold or flu, if you need time to rest and recover, make sure your backup plan is in place ahead of time. Check out these strategies and be prepared.

  • Besides saving you time and energy -- which we all know are rare commodities -- having your kids help clean now teaches them valuable survival skills they'll one day need when they're living on their own. But let's face it: Getting kids to help clean can be hard. So sometimes you've just got to get creative when it comes to cleaning up around the house. Here's some ideas

  • Pretend play is a learning experience for young children. It lets them explore the world around them and experiment with social and emotional roles. It also boosts problem-solving skills. So pick up a wand or sword, put on a cape and get into your child's fantasy world. Here are some new additions to old-fashioned make-believe games that you can enjoy together

  • In a recent New York Magazine article, a mother traces her own expectations as a parent and how reality clashed with those expectations. She cites mountains of data and studies showing American parents are more stressed and less happy than non-parents

  • If you're the parent of a perfect child -- one that never whines, argues, lies or misbehaves -- this article isn't for you. But if your child is guilty of any (or all) of the above, don't despair. He's just doing what most kids do. So how do you go about changing his negative behavior? Use positive reinforcement. Here, some tools you can use to bring out the best in your child

  • Parenting, my husband tells anyone who will listen, is the last stand of the amateur. This rings particularly true when children pass through the fun house known as adolescence. No matter how patient or strict or understanding parents try to be, the teenage years test our mettle and our sanity. We're suddenly stupid beyond our years, an embarrassment to the family

  • Sometimes a small concern can quickly escalate into feelings of real fear. If this sounds familiar, there are steps you can take to avoid making yourself sick with worry -- for your sake and your child's. Check out these strategies for managing fears that come with being the No. 1 caretaker for your child's health.

  • Setting aside time to sit down and write may seem like an impossible luxury. But carving out just 15 minutes every few days to jot down thoughts in your journal writing, frustrations and dreams offers unexpected rewards. All you need is paper and a pen (although you might prefer a computer or a bound blank book) and a sliver of time. Write on!

  • Your typical afternoon probably goes like this: Pick up kids from school; shuttle to soccer, music class and dance lessons; head to grocery store; get back home to make dinner. You probably wouldn't classify this as quality time. But who's to say that everyday experiences can't turn into special moments? And what better way to infuse fun than with these kid-friendly games

  • For most moms, mornings are a mad dash to get everyone up, dressed and out the door -- hopefully with some breakfast in them. But the a.m. rush hour doesn't have to be so hectic. Here, solutions for simpler, saner mornings

  • When it's time to brush their teeth and go to bed, many kids go into meltdown mode. They refuse to put on pajamas, plead for 'just one more story' and get up at least 10 times after they're put to bed. Sound familiar? Follow these steps for combating bedtime bummers and put more ease into your z's.

  • Creative and artistic experiences help kids express their feelings and come up with new ideas and ways to solve problems. Studies show that involvement in the arts boosts test scores and promotes academic achievement. You can get your child's creative juices flowing at home with basic art supplies and the right attitude. Bring out the creative genius in your children with these simple tips.

  • When you arrive home after a long workday, your mind is on your family ... plus the stack of bills to pay, the pile of laundry to do and the list of phone calls to return. But dinner? It's tough to imagine how you're going to make this meal happen at all, let alone make it healthy, tasty and maybe even fun. But believe it or not, you can. Here's how

  • When your kids practically come to blows over which one got more cream cheese on their bagel, you know you've got a serious case of sibling rivalry. It's likely you also know that there's no avoiding it. But while you may not be able to keep the peace between your kids, there are things you can do to squash the squabbling.