iHaveNet.com Gadgets & Personal Technology | Tech News & Reviews
Gadgets & Personal Technology | Tech News & Reviews

 

A popular early screening test for the second deadliest cancer in men is falling out of favor. There is very little evidence to support routine screening for prostate cancer with a PSA test

  More  
With the right ingredients on hand, even the most novice of chefs can replace takeout fare with nutritious homemade dinners. Our experts tell you how

  More  

  • Scientists have been searching for lifestyle measures that can help stack the odds in your favor. Promising research reveals three important diet strategies that can help you mount a defense

  • Men who routinely skip breakfast are 21 percent more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who ate something -- anything

  • Doctors may soon be able to warn patients of an imminent heart attack by isolating and examining a particular kind of cell gathered during a blood test

  • Based on the current body of science, these are the foods you should power up on to protect your heart from disease

  • A single extra pound may not sound like a lot, but when you consider that the average adult American gains one extra pound per year, it becomes clear why middle-age spread is so insidious and common. Fortunately, middle-age spread is not inevitable and can, in fact, be prevented. Here's how

  • Hypertension is one of the biggest medical problems in America; it sharply increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and kidney failure. That's also a shame, since excellent drugs are available to lower blood pressure and prevent these deadly complications

  • Menopause refers to the end of menstruation and fertility in women. It's caused by a dramatic drop in production of the female hormone estrogen by a woman's ovaries. There's no equivalent in men. So, no, men don't experience a male menopause. However, men do experience a hormonal change as they get older

  • Men face health risks particular to male physiology, but fortunately there are a few foods and nutrients that can be used to reduce or control them. Men need to remember that knowledge and prevention are the strongest medicines. Pride is not worth the risks you may take by ignoring your health, well-being, and the following healthy eating habits for men

  • Erectile dysfunction -- difficulty getting or maintaining an erection sufficient for sexual intercourse -- can have many causes, but is commonly associated with heart disease. The connection between these two disorders stems from blood flow, or lack of it

  • If you think you don't have to worry about erectile dysfunction (ED) until your hair starts to turn gray, think again. Even in your early 20s, chances are your arteries are already undergoing changes that may culminate years from now in ED. You'd be smart to adopt a healthy lifestyle now. Here's how

  • The term 'heart attack' does an excellent job conveying the severity of an all-too-common event. But it hides a remarkable diversity of medical emergencies that differ in cause, geography, consequences, and initial treatment. Here's a doctors guide to the different types of heart attacks

  • We guys like to think we're tough, that we can take the pain no matter what. You know: No pain, no gain. Ice it down, and forget about it. But ignoring some pain isn't tough, it's just dumb, and doing so could put your life in danger. Seek medical attention if you experience any of the following

  • We've all suffered it -- that dead tired feeling in the middle of the afternoon when all you want to do it crawl under your desk and take a nap. And, it always seems to come at the worst time when you've got a laundry list of things to get done before the end of the day. Incorporate these fatigue fighting foods into your diet and chances are you'll feel better

  • Calcium is crucial for keeping bones strong, and it also plays a critical role in the proper function of the heart, muscles and nerves. Experts have long recommended that women take calcium to stave off osteoporosis, a disease that weakens bones and makes them prone to breaking. But what about men, who make up 20 percent of the 10 million people who have osteoporosis?

  • Is a virtual colonoscopy the colon cancer screening test that everybody should be getting instead of a regular colonoscopy? I thought it was kind of experimental

  • You're wise to take vitamin D, but even wise men are likely to be confused by the complexities of vitamin D. Vitamin D is essential. Its most well-established role is to increase the intestinal absorption of calcium, keeping bones strong. But important research also raises the hope that vitamin D may help protect against prostate cancer, heart disease, and other disorders

  • Men have a lot at stake when it comes to their health. Fortunately there are a few foods and nutrients that can be geared toward a man's unique physiology and will go a long way to reduce the risk of many of the health issues they face

  • Experts have long recommended that women take calcium to stave off osteoporosis, a disease that weakens bones and makes them prone to breaking. But what about men, who make up 20 percent of the 10 million people who have osteoporosis?

  • Even the skinniest guys can put on some halfway-respectable mass and muscle if they work it right. So, if you'd like to go from machinist to Batman, follow these quick, effective tips on how to put on the right kind of weight (muscle, not fat). Here's how

  • The American Heart Association is hoping to boost America's heart health by 20 percent. How? Here's the AHA's 'Simple 7' checklist to prevent heart disease and stroke

  • Call it dry mouth, and it sounds like little more than a nuisance -- but call it by its medical name, xerostomia, and it sounds fearsome. In most cases, dry mouth causes more discomfort than damage, but severe cases can lead to important complications.

  • So you've put on a few pounds and gotten yourself a beer belly. Even worse, it's making your heartburn worse! Forget fat-burning pills and belly-reducing gadgets. The real secret to losing that tummy lies not in a bottle or some magical exercise machine, but between your ears. Here's how you really bust a gut

  • It's great to drop extra pounds and focus on fitness. But for many men, something else should come first -- a checkup. When do men get checkups? Typically, it's when the women in their lives insist on it. The good news for guys who are doctor-averse is that annual checkups are not always necessary. But checkups every few years can be lifesavers. Here's what experts recommend

  • Visit any health food store or pharmacy, and the supplement aisle seems to extend forever. But do men really need all those vitamins, minerals and herbs? Here's what you need to know if you're a guy

  • Want to be fit enough to conquer Tibet's highest mountains? Or maybe 'just' pass a fireman's fitness test? All you have to do is master this exercise regimen.

  • If you have chest pain or discomfort, how do you know if it's serious enough to warrant emergency medical attention? A few general pointers to help

  • A lot of men are familiar with certain prostate-related problems, such as the risk of prostate enlargement and prostate cancer. But prostatitis is a painful syndrome that men seldom hear about.

  • After having a heart attack or heart surgery, one of the best things you can do for your heart and your long-term health is to go through a cardiac rehabilitation program

  • Wide Gap Between Top and Bottom Blood Pressure Numbers
  • Some Blood Vessels More Prone to Blockages Than Others
  • Are Isometric Exercises Safe For the Heart
  • Another Reason to Get a Flu Shot: To Protect Your Heart
  • Diet and Health Can Play Role in Prostate Cancer Risk
  • Prevention for Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)
  • Prostate-specific antigen PSA Test Pros and Cons
  • After a Heart Attack: Following Rehab Instructions Can Save Your Life
  • Treatment for Enlarged Prostate Based on Severity of Symptoms
  • Medical Checklist for Healthy Men in their 30's

  • If you think taking care of your teeth is purely cosmetic, you couldn't be more wrong. My research over the last decade links gum disease and health problems -- especially problems affecting men

  • As people get older, the risk of colon cancer goes up. For most people, age 50 is the recommended time to begin regular colon cancer screening, and colonoscopy is one of the recommended screening methods. How often your husband will need a colonoscopy depends on the results of his first exam.

  • A recently published research study did find that men who took statins -- drugs widely prescribed to lower cholesterol -- were less likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer, compared to men who did not take statins.

  • Gout is still very much with us, and the number of Americans affected seems to be increasing, partly because of the obesity epidemic. It remains a disease that mainly affects middle-aged and older men, although postmenopausal women are vulnerable too, perhaps because they lack the protective effect of estrogen.

  • My 14-year-old granddaughter has just completed her third injection of the Gardasil vaccine. I know it's designed to protect her from cervical cancer caused by a virus. But men can get the virus, too. Should my grandson also get the vaccine?

  • Because depression in men often doesn't "look" like depression with stereotypical sadness and tears, family and friends may not realize that a man is seriously depressed. As a result, depression in men may go unrecognized because compared with women, men are less likely to admit to emotional problems and seek help. Fortunately, depression can be successfully treated. Here's how

  • My doctor told me that my prostate gland is enlarged. I don't have any symptoms and my PSA test has always been normal. I read that a drug to treat an enlarged prostate may also protect against prostate cancer. Is this something I should consider?

  • Strong-smelling urine has several possible causes. One possibility, diabetes, is a serious medical concern. Other reasons can range from diet -- specifically asparagus -- to a urinary tract infection, which requires treatment. Causes for strong urine odor include

  • You don’t have to let the cold and flu season have its way with you. Boost your immune system now

  • Want to get more out cycling? You'll need to make your bike an extension of you. Here's how.

  • There are no formal guidelines, but the advice I give my patients focuses on living a heart-healthy lifestyle. I encourage them to take care of their hearts because recent research has shown that what's good for your heart is also good for your prostate, particularly when it comes to lowering your risk of prostate cancer.

  • If staying lean is a struggle, you just might be hanging out with the wrong crowd. Here's how to stop your friends from making you fat.

  • Want to be the leader of the pack -- the guy everyone turns to, especially when the game's on the line? The so-called 'alpha male'? You won't have to wear some kind of testosterone patch, and you certainly won't have to take illegal performance-enhancing drugs. One thing you can do, though: Cultivate some alpha attitude. Exactly what is an alpha male?

  • Despite the number of vitamins and supplements that claim to promote prostate health, there is little proof to support their use. They don't help prostate cancer, prostatitis (inflammation and infection of the prostate), or benign enlargement of the prostate gland. In fact, when many of the popular supplements, such as saw palmetto, have been tested, the results have shown no benefit

  • Just because you're not ski-jumping, speed skating, luging or curling, doesn't mean you can't train like an Olympian. We're talking weighlifting techniques called Olympic lifts -- a routine that well-respected exercise physiologists and personal trainers swear by for everyday gym warriors. Just a few of these classic moves go a long way to build strength, speed and agility.

  • When I attempt to go into the outdoor pool at my beach club, I gasp for breath, get dizzy and light-headed, and have to get out. Several years ago, I read an article that some people who are very sensitive to cold water may sustain a heart attack from submersion into cold water. Is this a possibility?

  • Please let me know if it would be safe to undergo surgery with a low platelet count and if there's anything that can be done to avoid complications of the surgery.

  • I have had a PSA of 1.2 for many years. Now a year later my PSA is 2.1. Should I be concerned and check further?

  • That dull burning in your chest doesn't seem to be going away, and even feels like it's getting worse. Is it a heart attack, or something else? It's a vexing question, one that millions of people -- and their doctors -- face each year. What's the problem?

  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. And COPD is also a major cause of disability. COPD is not curable but it is treatable. Lifestyle changes and medication can help patients cope with chronic lung disease and live longer, fuller lives. And if you understand COPD, you'll know that most cases can be prevented

  • It's not just macho to push yourself to the limit -- it's considered cool. But how do you know if you're about to take your body beyond that limit and into dangerous territory? Especially in hot weather, there are risks you should you know about. As long as you can read your body's signs, you can prepare for pushing it without going over the top. Here, your body's warning signs and what to do

  • This past year, my healthy 54-year-old husband was diagnosed with a neurogenic bladder, which requires him to self-catheterize four to five times per day. This has made the things he used to love doing much more difficult, and it is taking its toll on him emotionally. Are there other options for his condition other than self-cathing?

  • I've heard that doctors feel men over 60 shouldn't be treated for prostate cancer because they're old enough that they are going to die anyway. Is that so?

  • Back pain is remarkably common. It affects most people during a lifetime. While most back pain gets better quickly, chronic back pain is also common. Yet, the cause of chronic back pain is often uncertain. Even worse, treatment is often ineffective. That's why so many people turn to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)

  • Medical Memo - Hearty Humor
  • Ten Commandments of Cancer Prevention
  • Vegetarian Diets & Potential Health Benefits
  • Statins & Prostate Cancer
  • Genetic Screening for Prostate Cancer
  • Proscar & Osteoporosis
  • Allergic Rhinitis: Your Nose Knows
  • Sexuality & Seniority
  • Healthy Habits That Make You Handsome