Elderly Health & Aging | Age Gracefully with Expert Medical Advice
Gadgets & Personal Technology | Tech News & Reviews

 

As doctors find new ways to extend our lives, more and more of us will succumb to the misery of dementia. Yet despite the advances in the treatment of heart disease and cancer over the past few decades, progress on dementia has been glacial

  More  
Living to age 90 is a worthy goal Americans are increasingly meeting. The 90-plus population is expected to more than quadruple between 2010 and 2050. Here's a glimpse of at what life is like in the United States after age 90

  More  

  • The quest for immortality probably began with the first flicker of human consciousness and was driven by survival. Although immortality looks as remote today as it did thousands of years ago, we have made strides in prolonging life and understanding why we age

  • Some muscle mass loss with aging is inevitable, but that doesn't mean you have to end up with sarcopenia, a condition in which loss of muscle mass is associated with a decline in muscle function. Not surprisingly, experts advise adequate protein intake

  • A new study linked microwave popcorn to Alzheimer's disease. Should you stop eating it? A nutrition expert shares her advice

  • A new study has found that praying regularly can reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease by 50 percent

  • Consuming more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, soy foods, fish, nuts and tea can help prevent the chronic diseases of aging

  • Education, engagement, and creativity produce happier and longer lives

  • Whatever the motive, volunteering improves the health, happiness, and in some cases, the longevity of volunteers

  • Physical places endure while memories and people fade, so homes and neighborhoods become 'memory machines' that help us keep alive some of the strongest sources of what has given our lives meaning, well-being, and happiness

  • It's not avoiding problems that matters, but how we handle them

  • While it provides many health benefits, pinning down the precise effects of belief in God is difficult

  • Wouldn't it be great if simply eating could keep your brain young? Well, good news: New research sheds light on how certain vitamins and other nutrients may keep your memory sharp and your brain agile -- and ward off dementia -- as you get older. So which vitamins and nutrients have the most promise for keeping your brain young?

  • Many business leaders routinely work beyond age 65. That's not new. But increasingly, they're keeping the lights on for decades after reaching what used to be the traditional retirement age. And while we see this trend in business, longevity experts tell us that it can be found throughout society

  • However independent they hope to be, most adults who grow old at home eventually need help with housekeeping and transportation -- and sometimes with daily activities, such as dressing and bathing

  • If there were a pill that could add two decades to your life, would you swallow it? Not if you're like most people scientist Matt Kaeberlein asks -- they see it as an invitation to purgatory. But when the University of Washington longevity researcher dangles the prospect that those extra years would be spent spry and hale, not enfeebled and ill, they listen up.

  • Age is often seen as an enemy to be battled or outwitted -- never mind that it's impossible to avoid and that the alternative to growing older is, well, dying younger. However, while there is no guarantee that following the example set by these folks when you're young or middle-aged will help you live a long and rich life, doing so will certainly make the journey more enjoyable

  • In an attempt to live longer, you may have given up trans fats or learned to love the elliptical trainer. But there's evidence that another factor may be just as important: your job. Whether or not you're employed, how secure you are in your job, how much you enjoy your work -- all may influence your health and longevity

  • We lost him a little at a time. In 2000, my dad, then 80, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and it began: He moved off ever so slowly, calling back at us as he went, trying to keep us in his sight

  • No one likes looking older...which is why we spend billions of dollars every year on over-the-counter products, prescription creams and fillers, and, most drastically, cosmetic surgery. Do any of these actually work to reduce the signs of aging? In many cases, yes -- at least temporarily. Here's a quick guide to some of the most popular treatments and procedures

  • Nations around the globe are staring down a rising tide of people who will grapple with the ravages of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. According to Alzheimer's Disease International, some 35.6 million people worldwide will have a form of dementia in 2010. That number is expected to nearly double every 20 years. Research is mounting that diet, exercise, and social and mental engagement play a protective role.

  • According to author Jonny Bowden, only about 5 to 20 percent of the aging process has to do with our genes. he rest has to do with how we treat our bodies, which determines whether, like a light switch, we turn the good genes on and the bad genes off. In his latest book, Bowden contends you can slow down the aging process. Here's how

  • Ice-cream headache, also known as "brain freeze" or cold-stimulus headache, is a headache some people get when they consume a cold food or beverage quickly. The pain is usually in the forehead or both temples, and it usually lasts less than five minutes. The cause is ...

  • It's well established that vitamin D helps with calcium absorption and helps keep bones strong. There's also evidence that vitamin D helps reduce the risk of common cancers, muscle and joint pain and perhaps even multiple sclerosis. For some people, it's difficult to get proper amounts of vitamin D from the usual sources, which are diet and sunshine. Dr. Philip Hagen of the Mayo Clinic provides suggestions in this article to compensate for Vitamin D defiency.

  • Osteoporosis is a silent condition in which bones become less dense and more likely to fracture. It's a major health threat for an estimated 10 million Americans with the disease and 34 million Americans with low bone mass. Often called a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences, bone density decreases partly because hormone levels (such as estrogen and testosterone) decrease as people age.

  • The term "palliative care" often conjures tones of a death knell, but the reality of what such services provide -- and when they can and should be recruited -- might be surprising. While death might ultimately become a part of the conversation, recruiting such care is not just about dying.

  • Millions of older women suffer the pain and stiffness of arthritis, especially in their knee joints, which can severely curtail everyday activities like climbing stairs or getting out of a car. It turns out there may be a way to protect our knees and avoid the discomforts of aging: strong thigh muscles.

  • Adult children often first realize that Mom or Dad needs help when there's a sudden hospitalization or a frantic call from an overwhelmed parent. In many instances, a child will discover evidence of a parent's deterioration during a visit. If you're too far away to monitor a parent, you have a couple of options ...

  • Brain health lifestyle can help us stay sharp as we age, and ward off the possible onset of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. While the science in this area is advancing rapidly, the message isn't getting out as quickly as it should

  • If your New Year's resolve to become more physically active has started to flag, the findings of several studies may help renew your commitment.

  • Researchers are learning that the aging process -- not only how long we live but how well -- is remarkably elastic, and that it can be manipulated. The lives of lab animals have been dramatically stretched in several ways -- by tweaking their genes, feeding them drugs, changing their diets -- that seem to make them age more slowly while prolonging good health.

  • The fact is, when significant memory loss occurs among older people, it is not due to aging but to organic disorders, brain injury, or neurological illness. Studies have shown that you can help prevent cognitive decline and reduce the risk of dementia by maintaining good general health habits

  • As all of us age, we face a difficult choice: Should I stay in my home, or move to a senior community or perhaps an assisted-living facility? Now, a growing number of neighborhood networks are providing the resources to help the elderly remain independent for as long as possible.

  • According to the World Factbook, these 10 nations seem to have discovered the secret to longevity

  • Wealthier people do live longer, but the reason isn't as obvious as it seems

  • Recent studies have begun to pinpoint why we age, and provide real steps to slow the ravages of time

  • Find out which vitamins and nutrients can help keep your brain sharp as you age

  • It's a phrase you hear in almost every marriage ceremony. ''Til death do us part.' But what about 'a kind of' death? Can you 'kind of' part? That's the debate raging ever since Pat Robertson used those words in justifying divorce if one partner suffers from Alzheimer's

  • 'I just think it's a good idea,' says Peterson, who considers the frequent tests essential to maintaining the couple's mostly good health. The Fairfax County resident brushes aside concerns about the downside of their screenings, which exceed what many experts recommend. 'Most older people do what their doctors tell them. People our age tend to be fairly unquestioning'

  • When it comes to spotting early Alzheimer's symptoms, researchers found that family and close friends may be better at identifying early Alzheimer's than standard screening tests conducted in a doctor's office. What this means is that if you suspect a problem, don't blow it off. Your suspicions may very well be correct. Warning signs that may point to a possible problem include

  • There's a buzz heard throughout the Alzheimer's research world regarding the effect of antioxidants, found in foods such as blueberries, on this disease. Given that by the year 2025 an estimated 34 million people globally will be diagnosed with the neurodegenerative condition Alzheimer's disease (AD), there's a lot riding on the promise of antioxidants found in foods

  • Dementia is defined as a brain disorder that includes memory loss, deficits in cognition, a decline in emotional control or motivation, and changes in social behavior (such as increased irritability, apathy, or problems interacting with other people). Alzheimer's disease is by far the most common dementia. Here's a brief review of the most common dementia syndromes in the elderly

  • A review found more than two dozen studies showing that the use of music and rhythm in physical therapy significantly improves gait and upper body mobility in Parkinson's patients, as well as those who've suffered a stroke or traumatic brain injury

  • Between acceptance and defiance there's a middle way of relatively small tweaks that will make an old face look younger. Age affects every nook and cranny of the body, but nowhere are the consequences on such open display as on our faces. Here's some small tweaks can help you look younger

  • A flood of cosmetics and other elixirs advertised as magic against old age is pulling in consumers on the Internet these days, often to their later dismay.

  • Apples are rich in vitamin C and loaded with fiber, particularly pectin, a soluble fiber that not only promotes digestive health but lowers blood-cholesterol levels. Increasingly, however, researchers are finding that apples have functional properties well beyond their nutritional value, and many of the goodies are in the juice as well as the flesh

  • Ask most people to name their biggest fear about growing old and chances are they won't say gray hair and wrinkles, but the devastating loss of their mental capacity. Alzheimer's disease accounts for 60 to 80 percent of all dementias. Here's evidence concerning various factors thought to either raise or lower your Alzheimer's risk

  • Is a virtual colonoscopy the colon cancer screening test that everybody should be getting instead of a regular colonoscopy? I thought it was kind of experimental

  • I've heard of doctors using TNF inhibitors to treat rheumatoid arthritis. What exactly are TNF inhibitors and are they safe to use?

  • Humans are living longer and the implications of this may overwhelm all other factors shaping the species over the coming decades. The longevity revolution affects every country, every community and almost every household. It promises to restructure the economy, reshape the family, redefine politics and even rearrange the geopolitical order over the coming century

  • Some studies suggest that extra weight helps older people live longer, but they may be misleading. Weight still matters, but so does the waist. Here's why

  • Would you believe me if I told you there is an Israeli women who credits her longevity to drinking a glass of olive oil every day? She's allegedly 120 years old. Whether you believe her age or not, studies have shown that there olive oil adds more to the Mediterranean diet than just great taste. It's a fountain of health.

  • Maybe your blood pressure has been normal for as long as you can remember, but that doesn't mean you should let it slip beneath your health radar. The older we get, the greater our chances of developing high blood pressure (also known as hypertension). Even if you don't have high blood pressure by age 55, your chances of developing it eventually are 90 percent.

  • No doubt, healthcare will be one of your biggest expenses in retirement. Qualifying for Medicare coverage at age 65 will quell some cost and coverage worries. But although Medicare is far more affordable than private health insurance coverage for seniors, the government health insurance program still leaves retirees with significant out-of-pocket costs.

  • Will taking glucosamine and chondroitin supplements help my aching knees?

  • Cleopatra was known for soaking her skin in a rose petal and milk bath to keep it soft. The ancient Greeks used honey and the Romans olive oil as natural skin moisturizers. So what's the real deal? Here, eight skin care essentials from the experts to increase your chances of having great-looking skin

  • Seeing more scalp lately? Join the club. Over 80 million Americans (60 percent men, 40 percent women) are losing their hair, and hair loss is triggered by age, hormones and genetics. And yet there is a multibillion-dollar-a-year industry promoting hair growth with promises that don't work. Here's what does

  • Shopping for a new car? Sure, that snazzy two-seater convertible looks like fun. But if you plan to keep the car for a while, look for design features that can help make driving safer and easier as you age. Here's a look at auto design features geared for older and elderly drivers

  • Teeth, gums, and the rest of your oral cavity need extra care and attention if you want them to stay healthy in your later years. Aging isn't always pretty, and your mouth is no exception

  • It's bad enough that your retirement savings are evaporating. But if you lost your job, retired early, or are turning to self-employment, you'll need to budget for health coverage. And the tab could be hefty. However, You do have options if you need to find insurance on your own ...

  • Hip pain can be a sign of many medical conditions. Some disorders, such as severe arthritis could, in time, require a hip replacement. But others, such as bursitis, can be managed with much less invasive treatment options. Exercise may help in some situations, but not all. Before you pursue treatment for hip pain

  • University of Wisconsin researchers found that feeding rhesus monkeys 30 percent fewer calories over a 20-year period seemed to slow down the aging process, protecting them from age-related illnesses like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease. Animals fed less "appear to be biologically younger than the normally fed animals," the study authors wrote.

  • Bath time, mealtime, and bedtime are among the hardest parts of the day. The Alzheimer's disease has a profound emotional impact on the family members who must cope with a loved one's irrevocable decline.

  • About 35 percent of people over age 65 fall in their homes at least once each year. That figure increases to 50 percent for those ages 75 and over. Most of the resulting injuries are minor, but falls can also cause major lacerations, fractures, head trauma, and other injuries

  • With a little effort and some medical problem solving, many falls might be preventable. The Rand Corporation, a nonprofit research group, conducted a large study called Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE). One focus of the study was falls and how to prevent them.